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DateLecture
01 October 2018Legendary Porcelain Collectors : Princes, Power and a Passion for Fragile Beauty
05 November 2018The "Glasgow Boys" and their triumph over the Edinburgh "Gue Pots"
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Legendary Porcelain Collectors : Princes, Power and a Passion for Fragile Beauty Anne Haworth Monday 01 October 2018

This lecture or study day was inspired by a memorable journey to Leipzig in December 1991, when, as a Christie’s porcelain specialist, the lecturer was asked to appraise some treasured Meissen porcelain vases and figures which had been hidden by their owners for many years. She has never forgotten the experience of visiting these residents of Leipzig
after the Fall of the Berlin Wall. They had a true passion for porcelain.

The lecture begins with the 1710 invention of porcelain at Meissen, close to Leipzig, under the patronage of Augustus the Strong, the self-styled sufferer of ‘la maladie de porcelaine’ and concludes with the sophisticated, wealthy and discerning porcelain collectors living in Berlin, Hamburg and Dresden, who fell victim to the seismic political events of the 1930s and 40s.

In the lecture we will meet others like Madame de Pompadour, the patron of Sèvres, regarded the possession of porcelain as a symbol of power and status. Her taste for sumptuous porcelain was shared by George, the Prince Regent, and Edward ‘Beau’ Lascelles, whose collection is still at Harewood House.